¡Casas Poquísimo! (Tiny Houses) – Emma Foster, Fo’sheimer and Filles Fabrications

Welcome, once again, to another installment of High School Sophomore Girls Renovate an Airstream, a.k.a. Project Ventura! Things are moving right along over here: we’ve already built a bookshelf and most of the bench framing for what is going to soon be the teacher’s lounge for our school. Wanna see?

Matt and Julie work on the first part of the bench

Matt and Julie work on the first part of the bench

Mariah and my fellow classmates show off the finished first part of the bench

Mariah and my fellow classmates show off the finished first part of the bench

In addition, Mariah and Matt from Comet Camper came by this past week to share with us their expertise on building tiny houses. To say they were awesome would be an understatement. We learned all the ins and outs of living off the grid, modular furniture, solar power, and how living in a tiny house (e.g. a camper) changes one’s outlook on life. We even got a peek inside the Honda Element they live in when on the road. I was a bit dumbfounded at all the multi-use doodads they had that allowed them to live in such a small space. My favorite was a little piece of wood cut to the size of the front seats to serve as a makeshift table.

Matt shows us the ultra-cool makeshift table

Matt shows us the ultra-cool makeshift table

Matt and Mariah give us a sneak peak of their mobile home in a Honda Element!

Matt and Mariah give us a sneak peak of their mobile home in a Honda Element!

Mariah and Matt’s presentation inspired me to look into more tiny house designs. Personally, I would love to live in a tiny apartment or camper, but I can’t really put my finger on why this is. Is it the sustainability? The ingenuity that comes with living a confined area? Affordability? Maneuverability? Some combination of these elements make me really want to build a tiny house like the Comet Camper.

Apparently there’s a whole social movement dedicated to downsizing the space they live in. At a website called The Tiny Life I found out a bit more about this movement. Most Americans live in a home that’s about 2600 square feet, and spend ½ to ⅓ of their income on housing. When ¾ of Americans live paycheck to paycheck, this can translate into 15 years of work dedicated to shelter. That’s a lot of money. Living in a house (or camper) that’s only 100-400 square feet can save you tons of money and resources, reduce your environmental impact, and help you live an overall a less materialistic life.

Matt and Mariah also introduced us to modular furniture, or furniture that is pre-made and/or flat-pack that can be flexible according to needs of a space, usually easy to install or dismantle. I was really fascinated by the examples they showed us, so I found some more. Here are a few of my favorites:

Kitchen5

I like how much counter and storage space this fold-up kitchen has despite how small it is. (source: http://www.designrulz.com/spaces-for-living/kitchen-product-design/2012/09/space-saving-furniture-compact-kitchen-guest-room-and-office/)

In this tiny office, you can fit a chair into a cabinet and fold down the worktable. This way, you can take your workspace wherever you go!

In this tiny office, you can fit a chair into a cabinet and fold down the worktable. This way, you can take your workspace wherever you go!

By the way, The Fo’sheimer Filles and Fabrications interior design, Hotel Morocco, got the most votes from teachers! This means Gus and I get to decide on the decor of our airstream. I’m really excited. Here’s the description of our design from our inspiration board:

“Hotel Morocco fuses the intricate lines, vibrant colors, and exotic spices of an African market with the clean, simple, refreshing feeling of a French terrace. It’s the perfect medley for the welcoming, sunny AirstreamTrailerWorkspace™ of your dreams!”

IMG_2753

I hope y’all enjoy!

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